Home Magazine Issues April - May 2018 Read our April – May 2018 Digital magazine Issue

April may 2018 - issue - whats inside?
Read our latest Digital magazine Issue,  April – May 2018 from Cover to Cover online now!  

WHAT’S INSIDE

23 FEATURE

Swim Safe Uganda

24 ENTEBBE
Accommodation
Business & Shopping
Entertainment
Health
Sports & Outdoors

35 FORT PORTAL
Accommodation
Business & Shopping
Entertainment

38 JINJA
Accommodation
Business & Shopping
Entertainment
HealthSports & Outdoors
Travel & Tourism
Wellbeing
Sports & Outdoors
Travel & Tourism
Wellbeing

46 KAMPALA
Accommodation
Business
Construction & Homes
Education
Entertainment
Food & Drink
Health
Motor Vehicles
Shopping
Sports & Outdoors
Travel & Tourism
Wellbeing

119 UP COUNTRY
Accommodation

IMPORTANT INFO

Map of Uganda
Embassies
Entry into Uganda
About Uganda
National Parks 
Travelling to Uganda
Travel by Bus 
We love our Pets
Places of Worship
Airlines
Things to do with Kids 
Entebbe Information Page 
Fort Portal Information Page
Jinja Information Page
Kampala Information Page
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8
10
12-13
14-15
16-17
18
19
20
21
22
24
35
38
46

DID YOU KNOW?

VERVET MONKEY

The vervet monkey (Chlorocebus pygerythrus), or simply vervet, is an Old World monkey of the family Cercopithecidae native to Africa. The term “vervet” is also used to refer to all the members of the genus Chlorocebus.

whats inside latest issue - Juvenile Vervet Monkey

Image:  Juvenile Vervet Monkey
Image by: Michelle Sutton at Little Elephant Camp

The five distinct subspecies can be found mostly throughout Southern Africa, as well as some of the eastern countries. Vervets were introduced to Florida, Ascension Island, and Cape Verde. These mostly herbivorous monkeys have black faces and grey body hair color, ranging in length from about 50 centimetres (20 in) for males to about 40 centimetres (16 in) for females. In addition to behavioral research on natural populations, vervet monkeys serve as a nonhuman primate model for understanding genetic and social behaviors of humans. They have been noted for having human-like characteristics, such as hypertension, anxiety, and social and dependent alcohol use.

Vervets live in social groups ranging from 10 to 70 individuals, with males changing groups at the time of sexual maturity.

The most significant [according to whom?] studies done on vervet monkeys involve their communication and alarm calls, specifically in regard to kin and group recognition and particular predator sightings.

 

 

 

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