Home Media Read Our December – Jan 2017 Issue online now!

December jan 2017 Edition read online now!
Read our latest edition,  December 2016 – January 2017 from Cover to Cover in digital format! Featured articles for this issue start on Page 32 

WHAT’S INSIDE 

30-32 FEATURE 1

Pangolin Conservation (UCF)

 

33-35 FEATURE 2

Chimpanzee Sanctuary & Wildlife Conservation Trust (CSWCT)

 

40 ENTEBBE

Accommodation

Business & Shopping

Entertainment, Health

Sports & Outdoors

 

53 FORT PORTAL

Accommodation

Business & Shopping

Entertainment

56 JINJA

Accommodation

Business & Shopping

Entertainment, Health

Sports & Outdoors 

 

63 KAMPALA

Accommodation

Business

Education

Entertainment

Food & Drink

Health

Shopping

Sports & Outdoors

Travel & Tourism

Vehicles

Wellbeing

 

119 UP COUNTRY

Accommodation


IMPORTANT INFO

About Uganda

Travel in Uganda

Embassies

Entry into Uganda

National ParkS

We love our Pets

Travel by Bus

Things to do with Kids

Conservation Organisations

Places of Worship

Road Distances

Useful Numbers

Societies

Airlines

Flight Schedules

Map of Uganda

Map of Jinja

Map of Entebbe

Entebbe Information Page

Entebbe International Airport

Fort Portal Information Page

Jinja Information Page

Kampala Information Page

8-9

10-11

12

14

16-17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

28-29

36

37

40

41

42-43

53

56

63

DID YOU KNOW – Pangolin

Pangolins are mammals of the order Pholidota. The one extant family, Manidae, has three genera: Manis, which comprises four species living in AsiaPhataginus, which comprises two species living in Africa, and Smutsia, which comprises two species also living in Africa. These species range in size from 30 to 100 centimetres (12 to 39 in). A number of extinct pangolin species are also known. The name pangolin comes from the Malay word “pengguling”, meaning “something that rolls up”. It is found in tropical regions throughout Africa and Asia.

Pangolins have large, protective keratin scales covering their skin; they are the only known mammals with this adaptation. They live in hollow trees or burrows, depending on the species. Pangolins are nocturnal, and their diet consists of mainly ants and termites, which they capture, using their long, specially adapted tongues. They tend to be solitary animals, meeting only to mate and produce a litter of one to three off spring, which are raised for about two years. Pangolins are threatened by hunting (for their meat and scales) and heavy deforestation of their natural habitats, and are the most trafficked mammal in the world. Of the eight species of pangolin, four species (Phataginus tetradactylaP. tricuspisSmutsia gigantea, and S. temminckii) are listed as vulnerable, two species (Manis crassicaudata and M. culionensis) are listed as endangered, and two species (M. pentadactyla and M. javanica) are listed as critically endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Large, hardened, overlapping plate-like scales mark the physical appearance of a pangolin. The scales, which are soft on newborn pangolins but harden as the animal matures, are made of keratin, the same material of which human fingernails and tetrapod claws are made of. The pangolin’s scaled body is comparable to a pinecone or globe artichoke. It can curl up into a ball when threatened, with its overlapping scales acting as armour while it protects its face by tucking it under its tail. The scales are sharp, providing extra defense from predators.

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